Knowing when to take a pregnancy test to get the most accurate results can be difficult. If you are trying to get pregnant then you want to know as soon as possible! If you suspect you are unknowingly pregnant, confirming or disproving this is a priority.

When can I expect the most accurate results?

It is recommended that you wait one week until after you miss your expected period to achieve the most accurate result.

If I don’t want to wait?

If you can’t wait this long, it is recommended that you allow one to two weeks after you have had sex for detectable levels of HCG to build up in your system. Sensitive home pregnancy tests claim to be able to confirm pregnancy as early as 8 days after conception and can offer an estimation of when you conceived based on the amount of HCG present in your urine.

Be aware that the levels of HCG produced throughout pregnancy vary from woman to woman, so do not be disheartened by an early negative result if you are trying to conceive, you may still be pregnant!

If you or a friend has recently become pregnant, why not book in for an earlyAssure™ scan? This reassurance and dating scan can be conducted at any time following your initial NHS scan and focuses on the development and wellbeing of your little one.

It is very common amongst expectant mothers to have a third-trimester growth scan, between 28 and 32 weeks gestation, to check that their baby is growing the way it should be. Here we look at some of the frequently asked questions surrounding this scan such as why it is needed, what happens during and what can the results tell you.

Why do you need to have a growth scan at 32 weeks?

As mentioned, this scan is conducted to ensure that your baby is developing and growing as expected. Hospitals may offer this scan as a routine or may recommend it if they suspect too much amniotic fluid. As a result of this scan, you will be able to see:

  • The position of your baby in the womb
  • If your baby is smaller or larger than expected

What happens during your 32-week growth scan?

Your growth scan will be conducted in the exact same way as all your other ultrasound scans, using gel on your stomach and a transducer device which allows you to see an image of your baby. Here, your sonographer will be able to:

  • Evaluate the volume of amniotic fluid surrounding your baby
  • Measure your baby’s head, abdomen and thigh bone
  • Measure the blood flow around your baby’s body

What does the 32-week growth scan tell you?

The 32-week growth scan looks at your baby’s wellbeing by measuring its biophysical profile. During the scan, the sonographer will be looking to see if your baby:

  • Opens and closes its hands
  • Stretches and flexes
  • Moves its arms and legs frequently
  • Makes breathing movements

From this scan, the sonographer will be able to see if your baby is small for gestational age (smaller than expected), possibly due to a lack of the necessary nutrition through the placenta or restricted levels of oxygen. Or if your baby is larger than expected, which is usually not a medical concern. If for some reason your baby is significantly larger than expected, you may need to get tested for gestational diabetes, a measure for the levels of glucose in your blood. High levels could result in birthing complications and enhance the likelihood of induced labour or a caesarean. In regards to the position of your baby, this scan will show whether your baby is head down (normal position), feet first (breech position) or laying sideways (transverse position). Your doctor may advise you to have an ECV (External Cephalic Version) if your baby is in breech position. This is a completely safe procedure whereby a surgeon pushes down and around on your abdomen in order to turn your baby into a normal head-down position for birth.

Our scan packages

Here at First Encounters, we offer a fantastic growth scan package that is available to you from 14-40 weeks gestation. Our growthAssure™ scan focuses on many of the things listed above such as growth and weight calculations, placenta position, fluid volume measurements and identification of baby position. All of which is documented in a growthAssure™ Report that you can take home and keep. To view further information on this scan or any of our scan packages, hit the links below!

If you have specific questions regarding any of our ultrasound scan packages, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us today – contact or send an enquiry.

growthAssure™ Ultrasound Scan >

Have you ever found yourself wondering what an ectopic pregnancy is, what causes one, or what signs indicate an ectopic pregnancy? We have put together an informal guide on spotting the signs of an ectopic pregnancy, which also explains the condition in greater detail, and outlines its possible impact on future fertility.
 
What is an Ectopic Pregnancy?
 
An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilised egg implants itself outside of the womb, usually inside one of the fallopian tubes, which connect the ovaries to the womb. Often it causes pain and bleeding, which may develop into a Fallopian tube rupture with internal bleeding, should the pregnancy be left untreated.
 
This presents significant health risks to the individual as the pregnancy develops, which means that it has to be removed, either using medication or by performing an operation in more serious cases. Sadly, the pregnancy cannot be saved due to the serious nature of the condition, which can be fatal if left untreated.
 
 
What is the Cause?
 
While the cause of an ectopic pregnancy isn't always clear, it is sometimes due to an issue with the Fallopian tubes, in the case that they are too narrow or have become blocked. An egg will usually spend around five days travelling down the tube and into your womb, where it should implant and develop if fertilised. In the case of an ectopic pregnancy, the egg hasn't travelled far enough when it implants, leading to it developing in the tube itself.
 
While there are certain factors which increase the risk of an ectopic pregnancy, one in three women who suffer the abnormality will have none of the known risk factors. It is important to know what these risk factors are as it may aid in identifying the condition if you are aware of your own personal risk level.
 
You could be at greater risk if:
  • You've suffered from pelvic inflammatory disease (often caused by chlamydia)
  • You've had abdominal surgery, such as appendix removal or a c-section
  • You've become pregnant using IVF
  • You've become pregnant whilst using an IUD or taking the contraceptive mini-pill.
  • You've suffered a previous ectopic pregnancy 
 
 
How Common is the Condition?
 
An ectopic pregnancy happens in around one in every ninety pregnancies in the UK, however, this risk increases to one in ten for the individual who has suffered an ectopic pregnancy before.  In 98% of cases, it will implant in the Fallopian tubes, but in some cases, the egg can implant in the abdomen, ovary, cervix or within a c-section scar.
 
 
What are the Signs of an Ectopic Pregnancy?
 
Identifying an ectopic pregnancy isn't always straightforward because the symptoms can sometimes mirror those of a period or miscarriage, causing cramping and bleeding. The symptoms may also develop gradually, or come upon the individual suddenly, with the early stages sometimes developing without any symptoms at all.
 
Some symptoms include:
  • Expected signs of pregnancy
  • Vaginal bleeding that is different from your usual period, which can sometimes be lighter and brighter in colour, or darker than usual
  • Pain in your lower abdomen/pelvis, which can be gradual or sudden, and may be on one side.
 
Signs of a severe case which has caused a rupture include:
  • Lightheaded/faint feelings
  • Diarrhoea or pain when passing water/stools 
  • Shock or collapse due to internal bleeding
  • Shoulder tip pain, which may be made worse by lying down
 
How Does Suffering an Ectopic Pregnancy Impact Future Fertility?
 
The chances of having a healthy pregnancy after suffering an ectopic pregnancy will depend on the individual, as it relates to the health of your fallopian tubes, and that of the remaining tube if you have had to have one removed. If it has been caused by a previous pelvic infection, this may have a further impact on your fertility.
 
One healthy tube means that you have a good chance of conceiving again, and six out of ten women manage to do so effectively, going on to have a healthy pregnancy. For those who struggle to conceive, IVF may be an option.
 
If you would like to try to become pregnant after suffering an ectopic pregnancy, you should first ensure that you have properly healed from the physical and emotional damage. As always, you should consult your doctor in order to gain the best advice for your personal case.
 
In the case of keyhole surgery, you should wait until you've had at least two full menstrual cycles before trying for a baby, and six months in the case of abdominal surgery. If you've taken methotrexate, you should wait at least three months before trying to conceive, to ensure that it is out of your system completely.
 
If you suspect that you may be suffering an ectopic pregnancy, see your doctor at once, or go to the hospital directly if you feel that your symptoms are becoming worse.
 
The earlyAssure™ scan package from First Encounters Ultrasound is an early pregnancy scan that can identify ectopic pregnancies and other potential issues early on. Click here to book your earlyAssure™ scan.

There are lots of symptoms that might indicate that you are pregnant. Bear in mind that pregnancy symptoms are not the same for each woman or each pregnancy.

Here are some early signs you should look out for:

  • Missed period
  • Feeling sick/nausea - also known as morning sickness
  • Tiredness
  • Mood swings - caused by a change in hormones
  • Cramps/spotting – as the embryo implants in your uterus
  • Changing tastes in food and sensitivity to smell
  • Changes in breast tenderness - they might become larger, feel tender, and your nipples may darken in colour
  • Going to the toilet more often - as your womb grows it presses on your bladder
  • Backache

 

Don’t worry, it is highly unlikely that you will experience all of these symptoms at once, and some women don’t experience any! The best way to be sure if you are pregnant is to take a pregnancy test

If you find out that you are pregnant, and perhaps need reassurance about your pregnancy prior to your first NHS scan, book in for an earlyAssure™ scan with First Encounters. This scan is available to mums as soon as 8-12 weeks after conception.

During the first few days of pregnancy, a fertilised embryo attaches to the uterine lining and your body begins to release a hormone called human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG).

Pregnancy tests determine whether you are pregnant or not by trying to detect this hormone in either your blood or your urine. Urine tests can be carried out at home while blood tests are carried out by your local GP.

Positive Result

If you have just done a home pregnancy test and find that your test is showing a positive result, it is almost certain that you are pregnant. The test has positively detected the pregnancy hormone HCG in your urine.

Negative Result

A negative result can be slightly more ambiguous. It either means; you are not pregnant, you took the test too early so not enough hormone was present in your urine yet, or you took the test incorrectly. Be aware that some home pregnancy tests are more sensitive to detecting HCG than others.

What Should I do if I Take Multiple Tests and get Different Results?

In this circumstance, we recommended that you visit your GP and have a blood test done to get an accurate answer, however you will have to wait slightly longer to receive the results from this test.

If you find out that you are pregnant, why not book a First Encounter’s earlyAssure™ scan? Available as soon as 8 weeks after conception, this is a scan you can attend before your first NHS scan to seek reassurance about numerous aspects of the pregnancy.